An American (Diva) in Paris: Classic Movies at the Festival Paris Cinéma

pariscinemaI am very pleased to announce that I will be covering this year’s Festival Paris Cinéma as a member of the press. And you should know, as I wrote that, I was pinching myself to make sure this isn’t all some kind of very good dream.

Founded in 2003, the festival, which will take place between July 5 and 12 this year, primarily showcases contemporary international films of note. However, there’s plenty to attract those of us on the old movie beat.

The program celebrates cinema history with a series of Paris Cinéclassics: new restorations digitally projected on the big screen before they’re re-released in France.

The cinéclassics program eschews any unifying theme in favor of a memorably eclectic bunch of 16 movies, ranging from Ford’s The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) to Losey’s The Servant (1963) to Hooper’s The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1973). Hitchcock, Preminger, and the Swedish director Bo Widerberg feature the most prominently among the selections bunnylakewith two films each. One of my all-time favorite thrillers, Bunny Lake is Missing (1965), made it onto the roster and I can’t wait to find out what new details I notice while watching it on the big screen.

I’m also eager to savor some lesser-known and hard-to-find films by French directors, such as Renoir’s Hollywood opus Swamp Water (1941), Allio’s dramedy La Vieille dame indigne (1964), and Benicheti’s documentary Le Cousin Jules (1973).

The Nouveau Latina, a beloved art house theater in the Marais, will present all of the cinéclassics, with one exception. The Louxor, a spectacular Neo-Egyptian movie palace that opened in 1921, will screen North by Northwest—known in France as La Mort aux Trousses, meaning roughly “Death at his Heels” or “Death on his Trail.” A bit more dramatic sounding, n’est-ce pas?

Speaking of translations, all of the non-Francophone cinéclassics will be shown in VOSF: version originale, sous-titres français. That is, in their original language, but with French subtitles. It’ll be interesting (and hopefully not too distracting) to size up the differences between the English dialogue and the onscreen translations.

50roles

Beyond the cinéclassics, ParisCinéma’s 2014 line-up is particularly rich in old movie culture. Sponsored by the Mayor’s Office of Paris, a series of 50 films at the Réflet Medicis theater, presented from July to December, will enable audiences to rediscover some of greatest female roles in cinema history. Coinciding with the festival, two showings of Alain Resnais’s Hiroshima Mon Amour will honor Emmanuelle Riva’s hypnotic performance as a nameless actress unsettled by doomed love affairs both past and present.

busterSilent music lovers have a treat in store with the festival’s Musique et Cinéma series. Les Berges du Seine, a reclaimed stretch of the river’s Left Bank between the Louvre and the Eiffel Tower, will host an open air movie theater. The general public can enjoy screenings of Murnau’s Nosferatu (1922) and Tabu (1931) and Hoyt’s The Lost World (1925) under the stars free of admission.

Best of all, film preservation legend Serge Bromberg of Lobster Films will share an assortment of rare treasures from his collection while accompanying them on the piano. Although most of his picks will be a surprise, Bromberg has announced that he will screen something particularly special: a newly reconstructed version of Buster Keaton’s The Blacksmith (1921), with added footage once thought to be lost forever.

The festival will close with a classic, too: Paris vu par…, a playful anthology film that preserved the look and feel of the city during the 1960s. Young producer Barbet Schroeder stoked the creativity of six directors—including such Nouvelle Vague vuparheavyweights as Jean-Luc Godard, Claude Chabrol, and Éric Rohmer—by challenging them to capture the spirit of certain sections of Paris in a color 16mm short.

In a touch of reflexivity that the Nouvelle Vague boys would no doubt have appreciated, the film will be projected en plein air on the banks of the Seine—an elegant twist on Paris in movies and movies in Paris.

You can read more about ParisCinéma on its official website or follow the festival on Twitter for the latest news.

On a personal note, I’ll be in Paris for more than a month. So, in addition to my festival coverage, I hope to report on screenings at as many of the city’s historic venues and art house theaters as possible. Brace yourself for updates on my next cinematic adventure!

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3 thoughts on “An American (Diva) in Paris: Classic Movies at the Festival Paris Cinéma

  1. The Bromberg program sounds amazing. I love that guy and Lobster Films! Wish they would have done that for SIFF. Can’t wait to hear about it.

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