Cary and the Next Generation: 31 Days of Cary Grant, Day 28

Cary Grant with Rock Hudson, Marlon Brando, and Gregory Peck in 1962.

cary_grant_brando_peck_hudson

Scanned from Cary Grant: A Biography by Marc Eliot (Harmony Books, 2004). Most of the images I’m scanning for this series are publicity photos, intended by the studios that created them to be reproduced and shared. However, since this one comes from a more exclusive publishing context, I have watermarked it with the copyright.

North by Northwest: 31 Days of Cary Grant, Day 26

Eva Marie Saint “shoots” Cary Grant in North by Northwest (1958).

Although the role of a suave advertising executive-turned-secret agent red herring seemed to fit Cary as well as his impeccably tailored suits, the actor was plagued with doubts during production. Screenwriter Ernest Lehman remembered the leading man complaining about how the script didn’t suit him, saying, “And what about this dialogue? You think you’ve written a Cary Grant picture? This is a David Niven picture.”

In the end, though, Cary happily ate his words after the film scored ecstatic reactions from an important preview audience. He phoned Lehman to congratulate him immediately afterwards: “I’m just calling to tell you how thrilled I am for you. For all of us!”

Cary Crant and Eva Marie Saint in North by Northwest (1958)

Scanned from Great Hollywood Movies by Ted Sennett (Abradale Press, 1983).

 

Cary Leaves His Mark: 31 Days of Cary Grant, Day 23

Cary Grant adds his handprints, footprints, and signature to a slab of wet concrete at the Schaefer Center at the New York World’s Fair in August, 1939.

cary_grant_at_graumans_footprints

Scanned from Cary Grant: A Biography by Marc Eliot (Harmony Books, 2004). Most of the images I’m scanning for this series are publicity photos, intended by the studios that created them to be reproduced and shared. However, since this one comes from a more exclusive publishing context, I have watermarked it with the copyright.

Rock-A-Bye Cary: 31 Days of Cary Grant, Day 21

Howard Hawks and Katharine Hepburn look over their scripts on the set of Bringing Up Baby (1938)—while Cary Grant takes a nap.

I’ve been trying to go in chronological order with these pictures, but I just discovered this one in an old movie magazine and it was too adorable not to share.

Howard Hawks, Cary Grant, and Katharine Hepburn on the set of "B

Image scanned from the May 1938 issue of Photoplay. You should know that I’m cheating a bit today because I didn’t personally scan this image—the fine team behind the Media History Digital Library did that for me! However, I did edit and enhance it.

His Girl Friday, 1940: 31 Days of Cary Grant, Day 13

Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday (1940).

On the subject of the movie’s famous overlapping dialogue, Grant recalled, “When I first started in pictures, an actor didn’t have the freedom to interrupt the dialogue. But in His Girl Friday, Rosalind Russell and I were constantly interrupting each other. The sound men would say, ‘We can’t hear you.’ And we’d say, ‘Well, you’re not supposed to hear us. People do interrupt each other, you know.'”

Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday, 1940

Image scanned from Hollywood Picks the Classics by Afton Fraser (Bullfinch Press, 2004).

And, by the way, I’m getting many of my quotes from or about Cary from Nancy Nelson’s beguiling Evenings with Cary Grant (Citadel Press, 1991), which I highly recommend for all fans.

Bringing Up Baby, 1938: 31 Days of Cary Grant, Day 11

Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn in Bringing Up Baby, 1938.

Although Howard Hawks deserves much of the credit for the screwball comedy’s bubbling atmosphere, Hepburn revealed that she and Grant invented many bits of business for the film and painstakingly rehearsed the zingy timing on their own.

As she remembered, “We wanted it to be as good as it possibly could be. Nothing was ever too much trouble. And we were both very early on the set. Howard Hawks was always late, so Cary and I worked out an awful lot of stuff together. We’d make up stuff to do on the screen—how to work out those laughs in Bringing Up Baby.”

Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn in Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Scanned from Hollywood Picks the Classics by Afton Fraser (Bullfinch Press, 2004).